Adobe Extending Desktop Applications with Tablets

This is very exciting. Adobe has unveiled concepts that use touch-centric tablet devices to extend asset creation as well as control of their applications.  We’ve all thought about it, we’ve all wished for it, and now it looks like Adobe is rolling it out.

They are starting with Photoshop, releasing a multi-touch paint application, an advanced color picker (with paint mixing), and a UI extender that lets you view open documents or choose tools with the tablet. I’m most excited about the last one, since it will grant notebook users the power of a dual display workstation without the bulk of dual displays. You’ll be able to prop your iPad up on the table and transmit everything wirelessly.

ocell.net Mobile

ocell.net Mobile

Lately I’ve been working on making my websites more accessible for advanced mobile devices. I started with an iPhone theme for my blog, then got my industrial design portfolio mobile. Last weekend I sat down and tried to tie it all together.

Now my main www.ocell.net landing page is very mobile friendly thanks to the iWebKit development package. This links to my design and photography portfolios which are mobile thanks to iShowPro. I used to use iWPhone to format my WordPress blog (what you’re reading now) for the iPhone, but when I realized it wasn’t testing for the Palm Pre and Android browser user agents I went out in search of an alternative. Now I am finally on the WPtouch bandwagon, and I have to say, I’m extremely impressed. In fact, the WPtouch version of this blog has more functionality than the desktop version… something I hope to address in the future.

ocell.net mobile on a Palm Pre

Also, thanks to @vara411 for confirming that the mobile version of www.ocell.net does load properly on a Palm Pre. The phone call link even launches the Pre’s phone app. You have to love when standards are honored across platforms.

Part of my focus on getting the loose ends tied on my mobile interface is because of the 2009 IDSA National Conference in Miami next week. I’m hoping that having a viable mobile site will give people an easy way to see my work and interests from their mobile devices, on location.

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Move your Boot Camp with Winclone

Winclone IconI recently replaced the 250gig HDD that came in my Macbook Pro with a new 500gig drive. I installed a fresh copy of OS X on the drive, and then restored all of my files from my Time Machine backup during the initial setup on the first boot. Everything went much smoother than I was expecting, but the process didn’t help me move my installation of Windows XP on my Boot Camp partition.

I plugged my old 250gig system drive into an external USB enclosure and tried manually copying the Boot Camp installation into a blank Boot Camp partition on my new hard drive. I wasn’t expecting it to work, and it lived up to my expectations when it didn’t. My assumption is that there are issues with things like the Master Book Record that can’t be solved with a simple file copy.

I did a web search and found a (free, donationware) utility called Winclone that was created for backing up Boot Camp partitions into image files, and then deploying those image files onto new machines. The application made an image file out of my original Boot Camp partition with no problem, even though it was living on an external HDD at the time. I then used OS X’s Boot Camp Assistant to make a new partition on my new hard drive a little bit larger than my old BC partition. (I tried making them the same size at first, but the new one always ended up being a little bit smaller and the restore operation would fail.) Once I had the new partition, Winclone restored my image file to it relatively quickly.

When Winclone makes the image file you can compress it so that the image is only as large as the actual used space of the partition. This means if you had a 32gig install of XP on a 60gig partition, your image file backup will only be 32gig instead of 60gig. I think Winclone will be a great tool for doing periodic image backups of my XP install that can then be dumped onto my external archive drive. Before, I didn’t have any backup solution for my XP install beyond Dropbox.

At any rate… if you find yourself needing to migrate a Boot Camp installation from one hard drive to another, or one Mac to another, give Winclone a serious look.

Winclone Homepage

Photorec: Digital Photo Recovery Tool

Back Entrance

Yesterday I was walking around Downtown Austin snapping some photos with my Canon XTi. I haven’t gotten out to take photos in a while, and I just moved to the area, so I was having a lot of fun. I framed a shot and pulled the trigger and nothing happened… I looked down at the screen and saw an error message about my CF card. Crap! I cycled the power, pulled the battery, pulled the card, all to no avail. I swapped CF cards and went on with my day, chalking the early shots up as lost.

When I got home I hit Google, looking for a free tool to recover data from a corrupt storage device. I knew that there were several apps available, but these few random shots weren’t worth the ~$50 price tag of most tools. I was also looking for a tool that I could use in OS X. Booting into Windows for a tool like Recuva was an option, but I was enjoying the challenge of finding something that would work in OS X as well. (Recuva may work great, was recommended to me by Kitch, but I never loaded it up.)

I came across a blog post by Jeffrey Friedl talking about his success with PhotoRec, a cross platform (and I mean, every platform you can think of) tool for recovering files from corrupt file systems, or recovering deleted files from anything. Jeffrey’s post outlined, step by step, how to recover photos from a corrupt memory card in OS X using Photorec.

If you’ve ever had a memory card go corrupt on you, give PhotoRec a try before you give up. I’ll be keeping a copy of this utility on my thumbdrive for all major operating systems from now on.

Jeffrey Friedl’s Blog – Recovering Photos from a Corrupt Memory Card with PhotoRec

PhotoRec Official Website