When it comes to price, the Apple Watch is not a watch.

AppleWatch

 

I’ve had an interesting point come up in a couple conversations after Apple announced their new Watch today. $350 is not a lot of money for a nice watch. People spend much, much more on watches that do a lot less. The difference, though, is a nice watch will remain relevant and perfectly functional for as long as you take good care of it. The Apple Watch will remain relevant for 2 to 5 years, while it’s function may slightly exceed that. How many times have you pulled an old cellphone out of a drawer to find that it won’t charge anymore? How long will it be before Apple drops this first-generation device off of its support list for connecting to future devices?

I don’t mean to say that the Apple Watch won’t be worth its price-tag. For many people (maybe including myself) I’m sure it will be. What I am saying, though, is that we shouldn’t let the form fool us into seeing it in the wrong context. This is not a long-term investment in a luxury watch. I think it should be framed as the same investment we make in any other electronic device, for better or worse.

Transparent Displays Are Coming

We’ve seen transparent displays in plenty of experience concept videos and product designs over the years. But now, products and technologies on display at this year’s CES is suggest that truly transparent displays will be a commercial reality within the next couple years.

Lumus showed off a development kit for creating products around their 720p wearable display lenses: Story at Engadget

Vuzix has working prototypes of their Smart Glasses technology: Story also at Engadget

Samsung continues to show off their extremely impressive “Smart Window”: Story at SlashGear

The Vuzix and Lumus technologies work by projecting a video feed in to the edge of a peice of glass. That glass then has reflectors (Lumus uses a hologram) embedded in the glass to reflect light in to the viewer’s eye. I’m not sure how the Samsung Smart Window works, but it appears to be an adaptation of traditional LCD display technology, without a reflective or backlight backing.